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By Philipp Rüsch

 

We live in a world today with almost unlimited possibilities. This can also be said of worldviews, paradigms and “truths.”

It seems to me that however you choose to envision the world, you can find a theory to underpin that view and a YouTube channel to follow. But I rarely encounter someone who both espouses fanciful or wacky theories and spreads joy, hope, and peace. Similar outcomes can be observed in people who constantly check the news for the most recent coronavirus statistics and death rates.

Not everything that courts our attention instills hope and leaves us encouraged. It is easy today, in the spring of 2020, to be discouraged. It doesn’t take much to end up in a vortex of distress, despair and hopelessness. One step leads to another.

But I have good news for you. In the same way a vortex can pull you down, an upward whirl can lift you higher. It may take a bit more energy, along with some extra responsibility for ourselves and others, to get the spiral headed in the right direction. But you can start a positive and encouraging snowball effect.

That will have positive consequences on you, your mood, your energy level, your relationships and the people around you. And by that, I do not mean to jump on the bandwagon of positive thinking or even the prosperity gospel. I am not saying to ignore pain and suffering. They are part of our lives and allow us to encounter God in new ways and to mature in our faith.

What I am saying is let’s implement Paul’s words from Philippians 4:8: “Brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.” And I would add: Share these things with others. Find encouragement and spread encouragement.

Why are Paul’s words so important? Because God is not anxious. He is not worried about the future. And neither do we need to be concerned about what is to come. Both the future and our lives are in his hands.

You are the person to speak an encouraging word to your neighbor, to give a compliment or constructive and uplifting feedback. With your mouth, you wield a great tool. Use it today to encourage somebody. It might look like a small deed, but you cannot know the ripple effects it will have on their mood, actions and thoughts, not to mention the words they pass on to others. Go and start a chain reaction of good. The little things are the best antidepressants.

Encourage somebody. Share a story. Give a compliment.

 

Give the bad news a rest for a while, and try this encouraging news:

 


 

Philipp Rüsch lives in Switzerland and leads TWR Europe & CAMENA’s HR team as well as MemberCareMedia.com. Setting healthy habits for a resilient life is one of his passions.